-->

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

NOVEL VIEWS OF MALOCCLUSION

How Novelists View Orthodontics and Malocclusion
 
Dr Larson R. Keso, former AAO President and voracious consumer of mystery and spy novels,  started noticing occasional references to orthodontics in popular novels. Some were cute, some were curious...


"She was setting at a computer wearing a pair of black librarian glasses, which meant that Virgil would almost certainly fall in love with her. The near-sighted intelligent look did him in every time. if she'd had an overbite, he would have proposed."2

"Luke gave an amused giggle and the big man leaned forward, his pronounced underbite making him look like he had an IQ of sixty"7

"Before a mouthful of braces had taken care of her striking resemblance to a certain animated rabbit"20

Log in  to the AAO members website, aaoinfo.org, and search on "novelists" to read more.

Saturday, August 16, 2014

EDITORIAL COMMENT

Editorial; 146(2):133-4
Pitching speed

X-rays were discovered in 1895, closely followed in 1898 by the discovery of the radioactive properties of radium. Almost immediately, a flood of medical products were introduced, marketed, and purported to cure just about any ailment that existed. Companies and products were branded with terms related to radiation, because it was believed that radiation produced positive effects and such branding increased sales. Various forms of radiation sources were added to drinking water, elixirs, lipstick, suppositories, jock straps, and toothpaste, to name only a few. Even products that contained no source of radiation whatsoever—eg, soap, whiskey, golf balls, playing cards—were marketed with names that contained the words x-rays, radium, or radiation. The belief that radiation was good for you was so strong that such advertising, although false, was effective in driving sales. This enthusiasm for radiation lasted for over 50 years but eventually dissipated because, over time, science sorted things out; it became known and accepted that radiation could be useful in specific, carefully controlled applications, but was also dangerous in many other ways.

Now, what does this have to do with orthodontics and pitching speed? If patients could change only one thing about orthodontic treatment, what would it be?  What are doctors eager to provide, and companies spending big dollars pitching to consumers?

Read the August Editorial by Editor-in-Chief Rolf Behrents to find out.

Thursday, August 14, 2014

AUGUST VIDEO: Microelectronic wear-time documentation






The success of orthodontic treatment with a removable device depends on the patient’s wearing the appliance as directed. Doctors can prescribe . . . but do patients comply? Researchers in Germany incorporated a commercially available microsensor into removable appliances and then recorded wear time over a 6-month period. They found that initial compliance was variable, but generally poor; however, it improved later in the treatment period, after the patient was shown a graph that documented actual wear times.  Timm Cornelius Schott discusses the study and findings in our August video.

Friday, August 8, 2014

ACCESS RESTORED

The easiest way for AAO members to access the AJO-DO online is to log in to the AAO website and pass seamlessly through to the AJO-DO. For the last month, however, this pass-through has been plagued with a time-out problem that prevented users from accessing archived content. Elsevier reports this morning that a code change has been released and the problem solved. So, if you have been frustrated lately in your attempts to access the archives, we are hopeful the problem is now solved.

Thursday, July 31, 2014

AUGUST 2014 NOW ONLINE

On the cover: The success of orthodontic treatment with a removable device depends on the patient’s wearing the appliance as directed. Doctors can prescribe . . . but do patients comply? Researchers in Germany incorporated a commercially availablemicrosensor into removable appliances and then recorded wear time over a 6-monthperiod. They found that initial compliance was variable, but generally poor; however, it improved later in the treatment period, after the patient was shown a graph that documented actual wear times. 

The smiling patient on the cover is Davis Luanava, who was treated orthodontically by Dr. Peter Pellegrini of Everett, Washington.

The August 2014 issue of the AJO-DO is now online.

Monday, July 21, 2014

THANK YOU





Thank you to the hundreds of peer reviewers who read and commented on articles submitted to the AJO-DO during the second half of 2013. The journal depends on the contributions of our reviewers.






Friday, July 18, 2014

CASE REPORT


2014; 146(1):108-118
Orthodontic traction in a patient with cleidocranial dysplasia: 3 years of follow-up
By Roberto Rocha, Manuela Batistella Zasso, Gilberto Floriano, Carla Derech, Gerson Ulema Ribeiro, Arno Locks, and Daltro Ritter

The second case report in the July issue describes the treatment and long-term follow-up care of a patient diagnosed with cleidocranial dysplasia. She had multiple impacted permanent and supernumerary teeth. The aim of the treatment was to provide an adequate esthetic and functional reconstruction of the occlusion with good periodontal care. The patient was treated with a multidisciplinary therapeutic protocol including orthodontic and surgical procedures, and traction of 11 permanent teeth.
Follow-up records taken 3 years after treatment show an excellent esthetic result for this patient.